The Terror 1928

[:en]

The Terror 1928 – Olga Redmayne – Mrs. Elvery – Ferdinand Fane

The Terror 1928 – Olga Redmayne – Mrs. Elvery – Ferdinand Fane named article is about a movie Which is the second all-talking feature ever made. It followed Bryan Foy’s The Lights of New York, 1928. Even The Terror’s credit titles were spoken (by Nagel) instead of written. Based on the Edgar Wallace play which had been a huge hit in London the previous year, and which owed something of a debt to both The Phantom of the Opera (1925) and the 1922 John Willard play which furnished The Cat and the Canary. (1927) It features a homicidal maniac escaped from an asylum who lurks in the catacombs below an old English country mansion now used as an inn, terrorizing the guests by his habit of playing the organ underground and wandering about at night in a cloak complete with hangman’s hood.
During one storm-bound night of murder and mysterious prowlings in which a medium (Fazenda) holds a seance and a bumbling fuddyduddy (Hor­ton) proves to be a man from Scotland Yard. The soundtrack had a thorough workout recording. Not only the howling wind, beating rain and wailing organ but the croak of a sinister toad and the endless screams McAvoy was induced to utter.

The Terror 1928 - Olga Redmayne - Mrs. Elvery - Ferdinand Fane
The Terror 1928 – Olga Redmayne – Mrs. Elvery – Ferdinand Fane

The Terror 1928 Is It A True Story

In one way, at least, the film was an object lesson in the problems that sound was to bring, since audiences were regaled with an ‘English’ atmosphere which involved Scotland Yard men snarling in Brooklyn accents… A heroine shrilling ‘Daddy, can you hear the organ?’, and the inescapable impeccably dressed butler opening the door to greet guests with the solemn enunciation, ‘I am the butler’. To compensate for the need to have the characters huddle close to the microphone in tight groups for the dialogue scenes, del Ruth moved his camera energetically wherever possible, suspending it overhead for the seance round a table and hurling it on rollers up to McAvoy’s face as she screamed. But the overall effect was still stiff, stagy and more than a little ludicrous
Türkçe korkunç hikayeler arıyorsanız buyrun.[:]

4 thoughts on “The Terror 1928

  • October 18, 2018 at 12:04 am
    Permalink

    Really excellent visual appeal on this website , I’d value it 10 10.

    Reply
  • November 12, 2018 at 9:52 am
    Permalink

    Great post. I was checking continuously this weblog and I am impressed! Extremely useful info specially the last phase 🙂 I take care of such info much. I used to be seeking this particular info for a very long time. Thank you and best of luck.

    Reply
  • November 13, 2018 at 8:58 pm
    Permalink

    I wanted to thanks for your time for this wonderful read!! I definitely enjoying every little bit of it and I have you bookmarked to check out new stuff you blog post.

    Reply
  • December 1, 2018 at 7:03 am
    Permalink

    I just added this website to my feed reader, great stuff. Cannot get enough!

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *